Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini

I was so excited when I saw that Khaled Hosseini’s new book was available here in Maldives so I bought it immediately without even reading the reviews nor checking what the book is all about.

It’s Khaled Hosseini anyway, I told myself. I need not check. I’m sure I’m gonna love it.

When I got hold of the book, I was surprised to see a thin, wide book. I was expecting a thick one.

Continue reading “Sea Prayer by Khaled Hosseini”

Instructions on How to Disappear by Gabriela Lee

In Gabriela Lee’s first book, Instructions on How to Disappear and other stories, she has meticulously and intelligently reworked numerous genre tropes. Set in future manila, a gleaming metropolis where one’s  paranoia may not be exactly unfounded and whose lashing sings tribute to Philip K. Dick, “Stations” takes on the ethical trappings of high technology adoption. “August Moon” relies on a succession of flashbacks to uncover, as well as obscure, the eventual doom of a woman who deems herself a “good wife,” while “Eyes as Wide as the Sky” depicts a post-war world – scorched yet not wholly devoid of hope. These stories insist on the unreal becoming the real, the rational melding with the irrational, familiarity breeding strangeness. An impressive debut.
– Kristine Ong Muslim, author of Age of Blight Continue reading “Instructions on How to Disappear by Gabriela Lee”

All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr

For Marie-Laure, blind since the age of six, the world is full of mazes. The miniature of a Paris neighbourhood, made by her father to teach her the way home. The microscopic layers wihin the invaluable diamond that her father guards in the Museum of National History. The walled city by the sea, where the father and daughter take refuge when the Nazis invade Paris. And a future which draws her ever closer to Werner, a German orphan, destined to labour in the mines until a broken radio fills his life with possibility and brings him to the notice of the Hitler Youth.

Continue reading “All the Light We Cannot See by Anthony Doerr”

Book Review : Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie

Just after midnight, the famous Orient Express is stopped in its tracks by a snowdrift. By morning, the millionaire Simon Ratchett lies dead in his compartment, stabbed a dozen times, his door locked from the inside. One of his fellow passengers must be the murderer.
Isolated by the storm and with a killer in their midst, detective Hercule Poirot must find the killer amongst a dozen of the dead man’s enemies, before the murderer decides to strike again…

Continue reading “Book Review : Murder on the Orient Express by Agatha Christie”

Book Review : The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen

The Sympathizer is a blistering exploration of identity, politics and America, wrought in electric prose. The narrator, a Vietnamese army captain, is a man of divided loyalties, a half-French, half-Vietnamese communist sleeper agent in America after the end of the Vietnam War. A powerful story of love and friendship, and a gripping espionage novel, The Sympathizer examines the legacy of the Vietnam War in Literature, film and the wars we fight today. Continue reading “Book Review : The Sympathizer by Viet Thanh Nguyen”

Book Review: The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel

A man thrown backwards by the heartbreak goes in search of an artifact that could unsettle history. A woman carries her husband to a doctor in a suitcase. A Canadian senator begins a new life in a new country, in a company of a chimp called Odo.

Continue reading “Book Review: The High Mountains of Portugal by Yann Martel”

Ligo na ü. Lapit na me

Ang librong ito ay tungkol sa isang lalakeng nagmahal at nabigo sa unang pagkakataon.

Normal na istorya. Pero ang ganda ng pagkakakwento.

Habang binabasa mo ay para kang nakikipagkwentuhan sa isang tropang nabigo na naglilitanya habang hawak ang bote ng serbesa at Bakit Ba ng Siakol ang background music o kaya naman Victims of Love na kinakanta sa videoke ng lasing na kapitbahay.

Maangas ang pagkakawento. Tungkol sa pag-ibig pero hindi keso. May kaunting kainosentehan pero may kapilyuhan. Walang arte pero may kaunting landi at bahagyang harot. May halo ding kirot.

Sa unang tingin, akala ko ang librong ito’y may kabastusan dahil sa pamagat at pabalat, pero tama nga ang kasabihang Don’t Judge the Book By Its Cover.

The Godfather

I have just recently read and watched The Godfather, and don’t ask me why I haven’t read/watched this earlier since the film was released in 1972, the book in 1969. Well, certain interests come at certain times of our lives. If I have attempted to watch the three movies earlier, I would have pushed the stop button after the first ten minutes of the movie.

The Godfather is about Italian Mafia families living and ruling the underground life of New York back in the early 90’s, Al Pacino as Michael Corleone being the main character.

I liked the book more than the movie as there are more emotions in the former. Well, that’s because when Al Pacino or Michael Corleone shows a passive stone-face on the movie, one wouldn’t know what’s in his head while his feelings & thoughts are well narrated in the book.

This is not a book or movie review by the way, as a review wouldn’t be relevant 45 years after the book/film was released.

I’m just fascinated about the Mafia idea, if it still exists (which I feel, yes, it still exists) and how they operate in this modern era.

I wonder if the rich families like the Ayala, Sy, Gokongwei, etc., do have family feuds as well and if so, to what extent? Perhaps not as bloody and brutal as in the old days? Just wondering.

I am also wondering if anyone has thought of remaking the movie. That would be interesting.